How You Can Organize and Run Your Own Blog Tour – Part 3

In part 2, I covered email communication with bloggers and how to maintain an effective “contacts” list in your email program. In today’s post, I will discuss: how to schedule blog tour posting dates with bloggers, how to keep track of the blogs and dates for the tour, how to network and market the start of the tour, how to begin the blog tour, and how to promote the blog tour.

The way that I scheduled posting dates for the tour, and had no conflicting dates where two people wanted the same date, was I started slowly by contacting a few bloggers at a time. I started with the bloggers I had contacted first in the very beginning and replied to their last email. (One thing I would have done differently, was to forward emails I sent that were not responded to, to the blogger they were intended for, when I needed to contact the blogger again, so that all emails would have been in one email thread and they could have seen my previous messages.) In the email, I told the blogger the date range of the tour and I let them choose the date they wanted. I received responses the same day, so I emailed a few more. I mostly had one email thread per blogger to keep the exchange organized.

I made a “blog tour list” that had each blogger’s name, blog URL, email address, type of blog post, ebook format they preferred, and the scheduled posting date. I turned the Word document to “landscape” and put one blogger on each line. As I scheduled the posting dates, I typed them on my blog tour list and highlighted them in yellow so that I could easily see what dates were taken.

Around that time, I published my book and sent out the ebook copies to the bloggers. I looked at my blog tour list to see what ebook format each blogger wanted, then I emailed the ebook and cover image to each of them using the email threads I already had going. I waited at least a week before I sent them any more emails, to give them a chance to read my book.

I began receiving interview questions from the bloggers who would be interviewing me on their blog. So I answered the interview questions, and after editing my answers, I emailed it back to them right away. I also wrote my guest posts. During this time (about one week), I did as much writing as I could, because I knew that once the tour started, I would be too busy running and promoting it to do any additional writing. Plus, I didn’t want to save anything for the last minute.

Then one week before the tour started, I began promoting it. I created events on Facebook, Book Blogs, and Goodreads. For the Book Blogs and Goodreads events, I posted a description of the tour and listed all of the blogs’ URLs and posting dates (with live links). For Facebook, I did not list the blogs’ URLs and posting dates in the description of the event; I only posted a compelling description of the tour to get people psyched up for it. I also published a blog post here (on my own blog) with a full description of the blog tour and a list of all of the blogs’ names and URLs. I tweeted about the tour too.

One other thing I did – I asked the leader of my Goodread’s group, “Writers and Readers,” if I could be involved in a Q&A discussion, which is when an author is spotlighted and readers ask them questions. The group leader just happened to be looking for authors for Q&As. So we scheduled my Q&A discussion for the first three days of my tour.

Just before the tour began, I emailed everyone a blog tour banner, which listed all of the blogs’ URLs that were on the tour and had my book cover design as the background. It is a good publicity method. I created the banner myself by uploading my cover design (before I had put the title, the subtitle, and my name on it) onto a PowerPoint slide and added the blog tour information. Not all bloggers are willing to post a banner on their blog, so I did not force them, but I asked them if they would and some did.

The night before the first blogger hosted me, I sent them an email to remind them to post. The email was easy-going, but well-written, and it included the posting date. Here’s an example:

Hi [blogger’s first name],

This is a reminder to post [your review/the interview] tomorrow [month/date]. I look forward to seeing your post!

Christine

(As you can see, it’s a very simple message, used just as a reminder, without sounding pushy.)

When I woke up and went on the computer the next day, I checked my blog tour list for that day’s blog URL. Then I went on the blog to see if the post was up (most of the time it was – thanks bloggers!). I then clicked on the title of the post to display just that one post. If the post had share icons, I shared it on Twitter, Google+, my Facebook page, LinkedIn, and Digg. Otherwise, I copied and pasted the URL on those websites manually. Then I went to my Facebook event page and pasted the URL in a comment, along with a compelling description of the blog post. I then pasted the URL into the “Post Your Blog Updates Here!” forum post in the “Blog Tour” group on Book Blogs. Then I created new blog posts on Book Blogs and the Writer’s Digest Community with the title being the same as the title of the blog post and put in quotation marks; a “teaser” in the body of the new blog post with a direct link to the actual post; and appropriate tags, such as: blog post, book review/author interview, blog tour, Christine Rice, and Freelance Writing Guide (my book for the tour).

After I shared the blogger’s post everywhere possible, I emailed them to thank them for their post and for participating in my blog tour. I told them that I shared their post everywhere so that they will get some extra hits to their blog. Then I put a line through the blogger’s information on my blog tour list to show that the blog post had been successfully published and I finished communication with the blogger.

The rest of the tour consisted of the same: sending “reminder emails” the night before the next blog stop, promoting the blog post, and sending “thank you” emails the day of the post (preferably right after sharing the post). I kept all the emails in my blog tour email folder until the tour was completely over. I still have my blog tour list in case I need the information in the future.

I hope you enjoyed this 3-part series about how to organize and run your own blog tour! I hope you will take the plunge and create your own blog tour. If you do, you will save money that would have been unnecessarily spent on a blog tour company, and you will have a memorable experience. Good luck!

How You Can Organize and Run Your Own Blog Tour – Part 2

In Part 1 I covered: how to begin organizing a blog tour by announcing your plans in various online locations, and how to find bloggers who would be willing to host you on their blogs. In part 2, I will discuss: what to write in emails to bloggers, how to maintain an effective “contacts list” in your email program, how to have effective exchanges with bloggers, and what to do when bloggers don’t respond to your emails.

Part 1 left off with contacting bloggers that you find on Book Blogs or on your list of followed blogs. Before I go into the new topics for today’s post, I want to mention that it is a good idea to follow the blogs of the bloggers you contact, because it is polite, and because you will be adding to your list of followed blogs which can be a helpful resource in the future. You can adjust your notification settings for the blogs you follow according to your preferences.

Now, on to how to compose and send emails to bloggers. I know it saves time to type up a standard email and send it to all the people you wish to contact, but you won’t get as many responses that way. It is more effective to write a custom email message for each blogger and to send the emails individually. The bloggers will really appreciate that you put in extra effort to speak to them individually and personally.

So when you find a blogger you wish to contact, you should first set them up as a “new contact” in your email program by adding their name, email address, and blog URL to the contact form. Before, during, and after your blog tour you should add notes to your blog tour contacts so that you will have a record of what your exchange was about. This is so if you delete their email in the future, which you probably will do eventually, you will know how you met and what your interaction was.

After adding the contact, open a new message and select their name from your contacts list. This is so they will see their name at the top of the email instead of their email address, which is more personal and effective.

Create a subject line that says: “Book review request,” “Author interview request,” “Giveaway request,” etc. Keep it short, simple, and direct so that it will avoid getting sent to the blogger’s spam folder. Compose the email message based on your instinctive feelings about the blogger and their blog, and what services they provide to authors. At minimum, you should do the following: introduce yourself, mention how you found them (e.g. I saw your post on Book Blogs that says you are looking for authors to interview…), explain briefly why you are contacting them and what your needs are (e.g. I am having a blog tour in November and I want to know if you would like to review my book/interview me/host my giveaway, etc.), state your book’s full title, provide a short description of your book if the genre or subject matter is not assumable by the title, state what you will offer them in return for their services (e.g. Free ebook in your choice of format), and include a “call to action” (e.g. Please contact me at your earliest convenience and let me know which ebook format you prefer). Each of these parts should be only one sentence long in order to keep the email short and more likely to elicit a response. Edit and proofread your email and then send it.

Create a new folder in your email program and title it “blog tour.” Move and keep all emails related to your blog tour in this folder until the blog tour is over. Next, you will just wait for the responses to come in. Don’t send a second email if you don’t hear from them on the first contact, because it likely means they are not interested. After you receive most of your responses, you can create a separate email folder for “no/no response” and put into it emails in which you didn’t receive a reply from the blogger (yet) or if the blogger said they are unable to host you (I did not have many of either of these).

Generally speaking, the best way to communicate with bloggers is by being professional, friendly, and assertive – all at the same time. You want to be professional, because you are a professional writer and a blog tour is a business exchange; you want to be friendly so that the bloggers will be more receptive to your emails; and you want to be assertive to get your needs (a successful blog tour) accomplished. (Maintain this style of communication before and during the blog tour.) Respond to your emails promptly, because there is no time to waste. Show your gratitude to the bloggers for agreeing to host you on their blog. Communicate with clear language so that your messages will be easily understood. Edit and proofread your messages before you send them to make sure they: follow the rules of your language, communicate your needs clearly, and are assertive and friendly. Think about all the information you need to provide the blogger and all the information you need from them in order to set up your blog tour. Then try to include as much information as possible in each email (without overwhelming the blogger or asking too many different questions) to keep the number of emails to a minimum. Each time you email someone, there is a chance they won’t respond, so the less emails there are (that effectively get your needs met), the better. Always end the email with a clear call to action if you need a response from them.

If you don’t get a reply from a blogger after they have already agreed to host you on their blog, you can send a followup email 3-7 days later if you need a response from them. No responses and having to follow-up makes setting up the blog tour take longer than when the blogger responds to every one of your emails promptly. This is the reason why a blog tour must be organized one month in advance. (Plus, it gives the bloggers time to read your book.) On the other hand, if you don’t need a response from the blogger at that time, wait until they contact you or until you need to send them another email.

In part 3, I will discuss how to schedule blog tour posting dates with bloggers, how to keep track of blogs and dates for your blog tour, how to network and market the start of your blog tour, and how to start the blog tour with a bang.

How You Can Organize and Run Your Own Blog Tour – Part 1

As most of you know, I recently finished up a month-long blog tour for my book, Freelance Writing Guide. I feel the blog tour was a success, because all of the bloggers posted on the correct days, there was effective communication between me and the bloggers, I made some valuable connections for the future, and it generally went smoothly and was easy to keep up with. Below I will share with you my tips on organizing and running your own blog tour.

For a month-long blog tour, you will need to start organizing it one month in advance.

I started announcing my blog tour around July 23rd (my blog tour started August 29th). I posted my announcement and my request for bloggers to participate on Facebook, Twitter, Writer’s Digest Community, LinkedIn, and here on my blog. Doing those posts was a good means of self-promotion, but it did not draw the interest of many bloggers who would participate in my blog tour. So I checked all of the blogs I had followed on WordPress by looking at my “reader” on the main WordPress page. I also checked the Blogger blogs I followed through Google Friend Connect (GFC) by going to a Google blog that I knew I followed and clicking on my profile picture in the list of followers; that brought up my GFC profile, which had a list of all the blogs I followed.

I checked out each of the blogs that seemed to be for writers or readers, to see if the blog owner was a book reviewer or an author interviewer. These types of bloggers usually have a page on their blogs that explains what types of books they review and/or their book review policy, what types of authors they host on their blog, and their contact information. If they reviewed nonfiction books or hosted nonfiction authors, I contacted them by sending them a message from their blog’s contact form (located on a page of their blog), or by emailing them if the email address was provided. I rarely came across bloggers that provided no means of contact. But if that was the case, I posted a comment on their “about me” page or on their most recent blog post.

I had not followed enough blogs in the past to acquire enough bloggers to host me, so I had to look at additional methods. In a comment to my blog post on here, Patty Apostolides kindly suggested I check out Book Blogs. I had never heard of the term “book blog” before, but I quickly learned what it meant. A book blog is a blog where the blog owner posts book reviews on their blog, and sometimes author interviews and giveaways. Book Blogs was where I found most of the bloggers for my blog tour. I will tell you how. After joining Book Blogs, the first thing I did was scroll through every one of their interest groups (currently there are 490) to find the ones that related to my purpose of acquiring bloggers who’d be interested in hosting me. Every time I saw a possible group to join, I wrote the name of the group down on a notepad. After I had gone through all of the groups, I separately typed the name of each of the groups I had on my notepad into the search bar on the group listing page to bring the group up. I reviewed each group a second time and joined the ones that were most compatible with my needs (to save time from joining groups that would not be very effective for my purpose). Some of the groups I joined were: Authors Needing Reviews and Interviews, Self-Published Book Reviews, Network Your Blog, Advertise Your Work, and Promote Your Books!. Network Your Blog was the most helpful, because it had the most members.

For the groups I joined, I looked through the forum posts, and used the search bar for the forums that had an overabundance of posts where it would take too long to look through them all. I commented on bloggers’ posts, who were looking to review books and host author interviews on their blogs, telling them about my book and asking if they would like to host me. I also provided my email address – since I did not follow all of the forum posts I commented on, because I ended up with a large amount of emails in my inbox from other people’s comments – because I would not get notifications for their posts. I clicked “stop following,” a link that is just below the main post on each forum post, if I did not want to get notified of followup comments.

Next, and this was the most proficient way to get in touch with bloggers, I went through every comment on the Network Your Blog forum post entitled “Bloggers Seeking Authors, Guest Posts, Giveaways, Or?”. That post was 27 pages long when I got to it, but it was more efficient to look through that one post with hundreds of bloggers on it, than to search for bloggers on individual posts. So I started from the last page that had the most recent dates and worked my way to page one, by reading each comment and looking into the bloggers’ blogs to see if they were compatible with me and my book (indie author of nonfiction book). Then I contacted them – not by replying to their comment on the forum post, because they probably unfollowed the post like I did, but by finding their email address on their blog (sometimes it was in their forum post comment) or (second best) by using their blog’s contact form.

In part 2, I will talk about what to write in emails to bloggers, how to maintain an effective “contacts” list in your email program, how to maintain an effective exchange with bloggers, what to do when bloggers don’t respond to your emails, and how to schedule the bloggers’ posting dates for the blog tour.

Blog Tour Surprise!

Good morning to all!

Today, the Freelance Writing Guide Blog Tour stops…here! This is the last day of the tour 🙁 If you haven’t seen it yet, check out my interview from yesterday with Christine Henderson on TheWriteChris.

If you didn’t see or notice the layout of my blog yet, yesterday I redid it so that the blog is on its own page, and now there is a homepage. I also changed the title and subtitle from Christine Rice, Author: All About Writing and Books to Christine Rice: Author. My reason was to make this a website that has a blog, instead of it being only a blog. I also created one page for my books, instead of a page for each book. I also moved the widgets in the sidebar around so that the pages of this website are listed at the top rather than a few widgets down. It was complicated before, but now it is simpler and easier to navigate. I hope you like it!

Back to the blog tour… This blog tour has been the best experience I’ve had in regards to getting the word out about my books. I have truly enjoyed meeting so many new people – many of whom are writers and authors – that have been so friendly and helpful to me. Thank you all so, so much!

I am very happy to have spread the word about Freelance Writing Guide, a book that I worked on steadily for eight months. It was fun to write and edit, and I’m glad that now more people know about it. I think it is a helpful book to those who are interested in embarking on a freelance writing career for the first time. I hope you will find it helpful too. I also hope you will contact me and let me know if it has helped you. I’d love to hear your stories about becoming freelance writers and if the book was accurate for your experiences.

Now, onto the surprise! First of all, thank you so much for visiting the blogs on the blog tour during the last month. The bloggers and I are grateful for your support. To show my (our) gratitude, I will give free copies of Freelance Writing Guide to all who comment on this post today and tomorrow saying what you like best about writing and/or how you decided to become a writer. I share about myself most of the time, so now I want to hear your stories. After you post a comment below, email me at christine@christinerice-author.com telling me what ebook format you want, and I will reply to your email with the free book!

I can’t wait to see your comments and hear from you! Thanks for helping to make the Freelance Writing Guide Blog Tour a success! I truly appreciate you!

I’m sad to see you go…

My month-long blog tour is nearing its end. I feel like I’m losing a friend. It’s been fun seeing all the posts about Freelance Writing Guide and keeping in touch with the blog tour participants. It took me one month to organize the tour and one month for the tour itself, and now, it’s coming to a close. I will miss all of the fun I’ve had. I hope you’ve had fun too – learning readers’ opinions about my book, getting to read an excerpt from the book, learning more about me, and reading some guest posts I wrote of tips for freelance writers. I really appreciate your participation in my blog tour. I know some of you are following along and reading the posts. My husband is too!

In addition to enjoying the experience, I’ve learned a lot. A blog tour is a fun time and helpful for promoting one’s book, but it is A LOT of work. First, I had to find bloggers who would be willing to participate in my tour. During that time I also finished the edits of my book and published it. Then I sent out the ebook copies to the bloggers. Then I was answering interview questions for a bunch of different interviews. Then the tour started. I answered more interview questions and wrote some guest posts. Almost every day, I promoted each of the bloggers’ posts in up to 10 places on the Web. I also published a few blog posts here to keep you all included in the tour.

I will be publishing a blog post this week with tips on how authors can successfully run their own blog tours, so keep an eye out for that if you are an author who is interested in having a blog tour someday. Now, I will share with you where the tour has been during the last few days and where it is going to be in the next, and last, two days. Boohoo 🙁

Last Wednesday – September 19th – Chris Eboch published my guest post on “Tips for Writing for Content Websites.” If you are interested in writing for Yahoo, Suite101, Helium, or other sites, you should check out this post! On Thursday, Ansuyo reviewed Freelance Writing Guide on her blog: Writing with Both Sides of my Brain. Her review is detailed, honest, and well-balanced. If you’re interested in writing professional book reviews, you should check out my guest post from Friday, “Professional Book Reviewing Tips,” on YaminaToday.com. Yesterday, my guest post, “Three Important Tips for Freelance Writers,” was posted on Literary Lunes Publications.

Today, there is an interview with me and Sandra of JeanzBookReadNReview. The interview questions are pretty unique, so check it out for new information about me and my books! Tomorrow – Monday, September 24th – I will be interviewed by Chris at TheWriteChris. Check out that interview to learn my takes on publishing, promotion, and writing groups, and my advice for new writers and what I’ve learned as a freelance writer. Tuesday – the last day of the tour – will bring you back here where there will be a special surprise!

Have fun at the next stops of the tour and please come back here Tuesday! Have a great day!

Blog Tour Updates

Good morning!

The Freelance Writing Guide blog tour is still going great and I feel humbled by the positive reviews I’ve received so far. It has been a pleasure to work with every one of the bloggers. The blog tour has been an enjoyable experience, and I hope other authors will be inspired to run their own blog tours (don’t worry, because I’ll be publishing a post on how to do so in the near future). It is a good feeling to be directly involved in the blog tour process, to get to know new people, and to answer interview questions and write guest posts. Without further ado, here are updates on the tour and what will come in the near future, as we approach the end of the tour.

Adelle, on her blog, Honesty…in writing shared a wonderful review of my book on September 15th. The next day, Karen, at Karen Elizabeth Brown, interviewed me on her blog. Yesterday, there was a thorough review by Theresa at Theresa Leschmann, Author. And today, Sage posted a touching review on her blog, My Name is Sage. Thank you, everyone, for your great work and for participating in my blog tour!

Tomorrow, there will be a guest post from me called, “Tips for Writing for Content Websites,” on Chris Eboch’s blog. Thursday, September 20th, Ansuyo will be reviewing my book on her blog, Writing With Both Sides of My Brain. And on Friday, there will be another guest post from me, this one called, “Professional Book Reviewing Tips,” on YaminaToday.com.

I hope you will take a look at these blogs and visit them on the tour. Thanks for your interest in this blog and for your kind comments. I appreciate all of you!

Regards,

Christine

Interview with Yamina Collins

Right now I’ll be hosting my first interview on this blog. Our guest is Yamina Collins. She is a self-published author and a blogger. There is a lot we can learn from her experiences. Without further ado, we will begin the interview.

Thanks for joining us today, Yamina. Your new book, The Blueberry Miller Files, is out now and it’s a short story collection. Why write short stories? Do they sell well?

You know, I am so grateful that the indie writer no longer has to worry about sales. Don’t get me wrong. I know authors want to make a living just as much as the next person; and if you’re an indie author who is being published by a small press other than the company you yourself created, well, ok, that could prove to be a concern.

But, for the indie and self-published author who is truly their own boss, like I am, you’re no longer in danger of being “dropped” just because your groovy little story collection only sold 50 copies.

Besides, there is no doubt in my mind that there’s an audience for shorter works. Yes, it’s true that we live in a post-MTV twitter generation. And, yes, people have short attention spans. But I say, a good, short read should be just up their alley!

So what are the stories in your book about?

Oh, there is no one theme that runs through the book, except to say that it’s a look at the human condition in all of its humor, awkwardness and tragedy. I think maybe I’m fascinated by sin, and how it affects us and those around us.

I had a blast writing it, though, because I got to play with different styles, ideas and subject matters, all in the same book, without fear of what some publisher might think.

So publishing via your own company gave you a lot of room for creative expression?

Oh, yes. Publishing my book through my own company gave me the freedom to be a black writer who writes about white characters (sometimes), a Christian author who refuses to use cursing in any of my stories, even though it might not “sound realistic” to some people (ah, well…), a humor writer who gets to explore the mind of a black Anglophile that adores Shakespeare a little too much, and a “southern” observer who does something I never saw done in Gone with the Wind: let the slave holders speak with as much of a jacked-up dialect as the slaves themselves spoke with. Ha ha.

Does running your own book blog help you with your marketing platform?

Oh, absolutely! My book was released three weeks ago, while my blog, Yaminatoday.com, has been around for about a year and a half. I already have a built-in-audience of 12,000 readers to my site per month and around 130,000 hits per month.

And yet, I haven’t sold that many books. Marketing takes time. My goal is to now hire a PR firm to help me get my name out there. But the blog definitely helps.

So back to the book – any favorite characters in the collection?

I love this character named Madam Adams. She’s a loony doll; an African-American Anglophile with a Shakespeare complex. Her parents raised her in Harlem, but she tells people she was raised in England by a group of thespians. She is a loveable nutcase with a fondness for bad writing, wine, and crumpets. I think she would make a great movie character, but I can’t think of any famous actresses who would play her. She’s rather unique, in my opinion. Then again, that’s what actresses do, don’t they? They inhabit people who are nothing like them!

Who are some of your favorite short story authors?

Edgar Allan Poe, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Henry James and Washington Irving, though not all of these people wrote only short stories. And, in fact, Henry James was known for the nouvelle rather than the typical short story, but ultimately, these guys were masters. Of course, few people have ever heard of Jessie Redmon Fauset.

Who was she?

Mrs. Fauset has been credited with being the midwife of the Harlem Renaissance, giving “birth” to such formidable writers as Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen. Most everyone has heard of great black female writers like Toni Morrison, Alice Walker and Zora Neale Hurston, of course, but few people are familiar with Jessie.

Any advice to would-be writers out there?

Yes. If you’re an indie author, treat your book with some respect. Give it the same treatment you would want a publishing house to give it. Hire an editor; get your book cover done professionally. Write and re-write, and then re-write some more. You want to compete with the big boys, don’t you? Of course you do! So don’t think sloppy editing and generic book covers will cut it when there are literally hundreds of thousands of books out there vying for the public’s attention.

With that in mind, remember that your book or e-book now has the potential to live a very long “shelf” life. The days are ending (and for the e-book have already ended), when you have a limited time to see your book displayed on a shelf in a book store somewhere. Your book now lives forever on the internet.

So the money you invest in it now has the potential to reap rewards years and years down the line. That being said, make it the best book you can.

Thanks for joining us, Yamina.

It’s been my pleasure!

Book Blogs and Publication

I recently joined Book Blogs – an interactive, lively community for bloggers and authors. On the website, bloggers get the benefit of promoting their blogs, gaining followers to their blogs, and finding authors to host on their blogs. Mostly, the bloggers have “book blogs,” which means they publish book reviews, giveaways, and author interviews on their blogs. While, authors can promote their books and find bloggers to host them. During my short time there so far, I have been using the website for both purposes, since my blog is part book blog and I’m an author.

I have also been organizing my blog tour. Getting a blog tour together is a lot of work! I have found a few people that will be reviewing my book (thank you!); plus others that will be reviewing my other books, which is wonderful. I am still waiting to hear back from other bloggers I have contacted about my September blog tour, so I’m hoping for more opportunities. If you would like to host me on your blog in September, I can provide a complementary ebook copy of my book, Freelance Writing Guide, for a review or an interview. I’m really looking forward to the blog tour and the publication of my book.

In fact, I will be starting the second (and final) revision this week. It looks like mid-August is when I’ll be creating the cover and formatting the book for publication in various formats. It will be available in paperback and ebook from Lulu, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iBookstore, and Smashwords (who also distributes to various retailers). The ebook will be available before the paperback, since I have to approve the paperback’s proof copy, which Lulu will be sending to me to review (and as you may know, shipping a product takes some time compared to electronic transactions).

It may sound easy to self-publish a book, but it’s very time consuming. The last time I self-published (in January of this year), I came out with second editions of three books, and I worked on the publication for days. Hopefully, this time will be a little easier, because I will only be publishing one book and I’ll be familiar with the formatting guidelines for the different publishers from last time (I will have to create multiple versions of my book, one for each publisher, because each publisher has their own formatting guidelines).

But, that is still weeks away! For now I will be taking care of blog tour communications and reading, as well as my other normal online activities. Starting  Thursday, I will be focusing on reading, editing, and posting updates on my progress. Lots to do!